abucci

anthony.buc.ci

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Recent twts from abucci
In-reply-to » Twitter no longer enforcing COVID misinformation policy

@prologic I didn’t think too much of him previously; didn’t dislike him any more than I dislike billionaires generally. He just seemed like a run of the mill rich guy con artist who happened to appeal to a certain type of tech guy. But, the other day he tweeted something about his first born child dying in his arms and how he felt the last heartbeat. But then his ex-wife tweeted that no, in fact the child had suffered from SIDS and died in her arms. And that soured me on him completely forever. He’s the sort of self-important narcissist who would make up something about a dying baby to try to score points in an online argument. That’s so pathetic and contemptible.

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In-reply-to » Wow twitter seems to be in a bad state.

@prologic yeah, but at least among the timelines I’ve been reading people seem to be going for Instagram and TikTok, with Tumblr and Substack also mentioned but not as often.

Obviously they should be using a certain text-oriented network where you keep control of your own data and aren’t targeted with ads!

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VizierDB, a Data-Centric Notebook

Wow, this looks interesting. A nice departure from Jupyter. It resembles Polynote, superficially, but is funded by the US National Science Foundation instead of Netflix OSS the way Polynote is. Interested in taking it for a spin.

Random thoughts:

I have nothing against Jupyter or JupyterLab, and use them regularly. However, the promise of truly polyglot notebook tools like Polynote is so high. I’ve never done a non-trivial data analysis in a single language/tool. Inevitably, there’s a great library for doing X in some other language from the one you started the analysis using, and you really want to do X without trying to rewrite it from the ground up. It’s been common for me to bounce between two or more of scala, python, sage, R, and KNIME in a single project.

I’ve been tinkering with Quarto, and while I like it a lot and the flexibility of its output formats is amazing, it’s a bit stiff the way Jupyter is when it comes to using multiple languages in one project. It’s also more tailored for publishing as opposed to being a notebook where you tinker. Cocalc is great and has amazing features, but it’s expensive if you pay for it and I’m unsure whether their docker container for self hosting is going to survive forever. I do like Polynote, but I don’t like that it looks to be supported largely by a corporation. So, the search goes on.

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my brain: looks like there’s an OS upgrade for the laptop let’s install it

also my brain: no way it’s getting late if something goes wrong you’ll be up for hours trying to fix it

my fingers: oops I already hit Yes lol

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In-reply-to » I'm loving the way Microsoft Edge allows you to see the tabs vertically. Perhaps it's available on other browsers, but I haven't seen it.

@eaplmx you know, stick with what you like. for me, Vivaldi’s handling of tabs is pretty nice. I like that you can stack tabs in groups and name the groups. and you can put them along the side or at the top of the window.

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In-reply-to » I run gitbucket, a github-like web application for managing git-based projects, including issues, notifications, webhooks, etc. Basically all the stuff you'd expect to have. gitbucket is a written in scala, and deployed as a single 70 Mbyte jar/war file that can be executed directly on a JVM or mounted via a (JVM) servlet container. I run it with a max RAM usage of 256 Mbytes and it runs fine.

@prologic excellent, thanks! I’ll give that a try.

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In-reply-to » I run gitbucket, a github-like web application for managing git-based projects, including issues, notifications, webhooks, etc. Basically all the stuff you'd expect to have. gitbucket is a written in scala, and deployed as a single 70 Mbyte jar/war file that can be executed directly on a JVM or mounted via a (JVM) servlet container. I run it with a max RAM usage of 256 Mbytes and it runs fine.

@prologic 🤔 how’s that go, sync the feed locally, delete the post(s) I want to delete, then sync it back to the server?

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In-reply-to » I run gitbucket, a github-like web application for managing git-based projects, including issues, notifications, webhooks, etc. Basically all the stuff you'd expect to have. gitbucket is a written in scala, and deployed as a single 70 Mbyte jar/war file that can be executed directly on a JVM or mounted via a (JVM) servlet container. I run it with a max RAM usage of 256 Mbytes and it runs fine.

@support well crap how do I delete this post?

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I run gitbucket, a github-like web application for managing git-based projects, including issues, notifications, webhooks, etc. Basically all the stuff you’d expect to have. gitbucket is a written in scala, and deployed as a single 70 Mbyte jar/war file that can be executed directly on a JVM or mounted via a (JVM) servlet container. I run it with a max RAM usage of 256 Mbytes and it runs fine.

I don’t get why people hate on JVM apps so much. That’s pretty lightweight given what it does for you. gitea wants 512 Mbyte 1 Gbyte according to their own docs. I assume you could reduce that safely, but still.

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Voted by mail last week. I did something unusual for me this year, which is vote right down the line for candidates of the not-trying-to-destroy-the-country-as-we-know-it party. Usually I’m more circumspect about who I vote for. I’d check out their policy proposals and not pay much attention to party affiliation. Not this year. This year, party affiliation is a make it or break it issue imo.

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In-reply-to » The Linux Kernel Has Been Forcing Different Behavior For Processes Starting With "X" An ugly hack within the Linux kernel that has been in mainline for over three years has been called out. Due to a buggy X.Org Server / xf86-video-modesetting DDX, the Linux kernel has been imposing different behavior on whether a process starts with "X" and in turn disable the atomic mode-setting support... ⌘ Read more

@phoronix lmao

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Today my baby plunged his hand right into my coffee before I could react. Luckily it wasn’t hot! He’s tried this before but since we never let him do stuff like that he seemed to have given up trying. Guess not!

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In-reply-to » Learned a cute little trick on github today and figured I'd share in case there are others like me who didn't know this.

@justamoment that’s the thing–in the instance I posted, that option was not available. Its possible they were using HSTS. the only thing that worked was the thisisunsafe business

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In-reply-to » The edgelord-to-rightwing-conspiracy-theorist pipeline continues apace. Media

There are people who’d say “no way am I going up against Musk! I’ll never get a tech job again!” Think about what that means for a second, if you hold that belief or sympathize with it. It means there’s one rich guy whose whims frighten you so much that you refuse to advocate for yourself out of fear of reprisal. That’s how mobs work. Rich individuals are not supposed to have that kind of power. It even violates the basic tenets of capitalism, let alone the basic tenets of democracy/rule of law. If you’re living in fear like that, something has gone way off the rails. Naturally you have to protect yourself and if that’s what you feel is right then I’m not here to criticize. I just think it’s important to recognize the world we inhabit for what it is.

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In-reply-to » The edgelord-to-rightwing-conspiracy-theorist pipeline continues apace. Media

Since it looks like Musk it going to try going through with mass layoffs, I’ve been sharing information about what to do on LinkedIn for Twitter employees who happen to follow me. In the US, this act is likely illegal: the WARN Act requires 60-90 days warning before mass layoffs can be conducted. There are protections in place at the federal and state level against abuses like this. That doesn’t mean these protections will be applied, but not pursuing some kind of remedy here is a guarantee they won’t. Whatever Musk’s actual aims might be, if allowed to go on like this what’s happening at Twitter is a big step backwards in terms of labor protections.

Nothing remotely like this would be possible if the tech industry were unionized, which it really ought to consider doing.

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In-reply-to » It's a beautiful fall afternoon and I have the day off. What are you all working on today? I've been working on a script that pulls in updates for a number of Git repositories at once in order to keep an updated local archive of them.

@mckinley To be perfectly honest, right now it’s used as a proof-of-concept in demo-oriented meetings in an attempt to drum up support for further development. The vision, though, is to do a variety of real-world things with it. The real power of a simulation is that you can set up a wide variety of what-if scenarios, run them, and see what happens, even gathering statistics about the outcomes. You can’t rewind and re-run the real world to see what would have happened if you’d made different choices, or if your luck had gone differently, but a simulation gives you (some very limited but still valuable) ability to do that. Armed with something like that, you can use it to plan investments to maximize resilience; test emergency response plans for effectiveness; conduct training exercises; or, even guide emergency response as an event is unfolding.

We focus in particular on what are called black sky events, namely events that lead to a wide-area crash of the electric grid. Natural events like geomagnetic storms can do this, but so can man-made events. Texas came very very close to this scale of crash in 2021. It doesn’t seem to be that well known, but if a large-enough segment of the US power grid were to go offline, it could take weeks or months to bring it back; so called “black start” capabilities are limited, and have been degrading due to lack of attention and maintenance. So, a simulation can also bring out just how bad the impacts would be were such an event to occur and thereby spur action.

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In-reply-to » Learned a cute little trick on github today and figured I'd share in case there are others like me who didn't know this.

@ocdtrekkie Going from fully, safely browsable to 🚨STOP!!! YOU WILL BE HAXXED IF U VISIT🚨 overnight is pretty harsh. Why not have the warning before certificate expiration, though? Does it really matter? One way or another you’re cutting someone off from using the site eventually.

Back in the Good Old Days you could email webmaster@example.com, ask them if their site was still working correctly, and expect an answer. I guess back in the Good Old Days you didn’t expect instantaneous delivery of content at all times forever, though.

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In-reply-to » Mastodon Gained 70,000 Users After Musk's Twitter Takeover "More than 70,000 users joined Mastodon on the day after Musk's Twitter takeover announcement," writes Slashdot reader votsalo. "Mastodon is a six-year-old decentralized social media platform that uses 'federated' servers." The Guardian's Wilfred Chan writes: I joined Mastodon this week, and it took a few hours just to master its new vocabulary. Some of it is ... ⌘ Read more

@eaplmx wow that’s surprising to me

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In-reply-to » Mastodon Gained 70,000 Users After Musk's Twitter Takeover "More than 70,000 users joined Mastodon on the day after Musk's Twitter takeover announcement," writes Slashdot reader votsalo. "Mastodon is a six-year-old decentralized social media platform that uses 'federated' servers." The Guardian's Wilfred Chan writes: I joined Mastodon this week, and it took a few hours just to master its new vocabulary. Some of it is ... ⌘ Read more

@eaplmx hmm, could be. My knee-jerk assumption was that many of these people are boomers or boomer equivalents, the kind of people who found email absolutely mystifying for 20 years, but now spend all day forwarding emails about politics or bad jokes to their kids who don’t want them.

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In-reply-to » Mastodon Gained 70,000 Users After Musk's Twitter Takeover "More than 70,000 users joined Mastodon on the day after Musk's Twitter takeover announcement," writes Slashdot reader votsalo. "Mastodon is a six-year-old decentralized social media platform that uses 'federated' servers." The Guardian's Wilfred Chan writes: I joined Mastodon this week, and it took a few hours just to master its new vocabulary. Some of it is ... ⌘ Read more

@prologic not that I’m a fan of mastodon, but I’m always blown away by articles like this where someone says

it took a few hours just to master its new vocabulary.

What? Mastodon looks like a clone of twitter. You “toot” instead of “tweet”. There’s a Mastodon mascot instead of a bird. The freakin’ icons for replying and boosting (which is retweeting if you’re keeping score) look the same. They retained the star that twitter used to have for favorites. The learning curve is about as flat as it could possibly be. It took me all of five minutes to get oriented when I joined there. Who are these people who take “hours”?

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In-reply-to » It's a beautiful fall afternoon and I have the day off. What are you all working on today? I've been working on a script that pulls in updates for a number of Git repositories at once in order to keep an updated local archive of them.

@mckinley The bottleneck in distributed simulations is almost always the network, so we pay special attention to minimizing network use and reducing the impact of network latency as much as possible. But I find these are “easy” problems compared to the state management problems I alluded to in the previous twt (they’re not easy at all but they are less thorny let’s say)

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