lyse

lyse.isobeef.org

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Recent twts from lyse
In-reply-to » Sorry, I was out with the scouts.

@tkanos@twtxt.net Scouting is really great, yes! My best school mate introduced me to it some time at the end of school or beginning of uni, can’t remember. I was invited to the last two days of the scout group camp he had organized. All the folks welcomed me open-heartedly and after just an hour I felt like I was with mates I knew for several years. In fact, I just met them that day for the first time. It took me about another two years to finally hand in my registration. There was just too much else going on. Since I joined very late, I couldn’t be a rover (last youth section, age 16-21 here) anymore. I became a volunteer since I didn’t want to start right off as a leader without even knowing the basics. And then I just stuck with it ever since. :-)

I have to add, this conference was just for our leaders round table — that is leaders, volunteers and a bunch of rovers. No kids this time. But the week before we had the annual scout meeting on Saturday afternoon with the whole group, followed by a scout church service (scouting is affiliated to the church rather than the military in I suppose most of Europe). After that we had a bbq in the church yard for everybody to attend for free. I helped setting it up while most of us were in church. On Sunday we played games with all the kids, grilled stick bread on the fire and then older kids were “levelled up” to the next youth sections and got their new colored scarfs of their new troops.

German report of that weekend: https://dpsg-salach.de/2022/bericht-vom-stammeswochenende/

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In-reply-to » Sorry, I was out with the scouts.

@prologic@twtxt.net @tkanos@twtxt.net I’m a volunteer not a leader, so I don’t have a group of kids, but I help out at most events. Our yearly conference was good fun. We went through a few topics, scheduled most events for next year and assigned organizers. Later, we went on an excursion to nearby Schloss Weißenstein where we got a guided tour through the palace and saw super amazing microscopic shots of all sorts of things. The tour guide’s dad was a pioneer on microscopic photography. The absolute highlight at the end was watching some kind of glue crystalizing live. Highly entertaining science art. I’ll be back some day, that’s for sure.

In order to get to the Kreuzberghütte that we rented for the weekend, we split up into two groups and went for a scavenger hunt. It took both teams a bit longer than we anticipated, but they all made it. On the way back we discovered that one group solved one quizz completely and utterly wrong, but still managed to find the final solution with the next coordinates. They parked a few meters ahead than what we had planned and found something completely different, that still perfectly matched the vaguge description on their note.

For dinner on Friday we cooked Linsen mit Spätzle at the hut. When we wanted to roast onions a gas smell suddenly was in the air. So we quickly shut down the gas stove and checked for leaks, but couldn’t find any. Next attempt and the gas smell was back again. We knew the group before us broke one of the two pit toilets, reported the hand water pump in the kitchen to be broken (worked flawless after priming, though), didn’t turn off the main gas tap, left a filthy baking tray behind, didn’t close a window shutter, so we figured maybe that’s also why the stove was cactus. Hence we decided to get our own gas cooking equipment from our material store. Luckily, we stayed regionally, so about one and a half hours to two later we were back in business. When finally dressing the salad we noticed, that the olive oil with truffle was the cause for the gas smell. Never use this kind of oil for browing onion, kids! Unless you wanna have a good story to tell (and delay your meal).

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In-reply-to » I'm weeding out my old school stuff. What a giant paper mess.

@movq@www.uninformativ.de Only a few things I really looked at in more detail. I decided to keep a few pages. CS even in total without glimpsing over. But most of the stuff I just checked for recycling as scratch paper. No real gems, though. There are a lot of centimeters in height to cover in the future.

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In-reply-to » I'm weeding out my old school stuff. What a giant paper mess.

A few hours later I got rid of 27 cm double-sided printed or written DIN A4 paper and have a 10 cm stack of scratch paper for the rest of my life. To be continued.

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In-reply-to » #215 - Newlines without Unicode - yarn - Mills -- We discussed the idea of changing the way we handle Newlines in Twts once upon a time, but nobody adopted it, we didn't amend the spec and really we just kept the existing spec as-is using the \2028 and simpler search/replace in place. Did we want to revisit this again in a potential Twtxt v2 spec rewrite, or are we happy with how this works? 🤔 cc @movq @lyse @tkanos (please add other client authors to this thread) #Twtxt #Spec #Multiline

@prologic@twtxt.net @mckinley@twtxt.net I share the same opinion.

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In-reply-to » I noticed some unnecessary horizontal rules being rendered at the bottom of twts in the conversation view lately with yarnd's new design change. They can be seen at least when not being logged in. Not sure if it is the same experience with an active user session. I reckon there will be fork buttons then, so in that case they would be fine, indeed.

@prologic@twtxt.net @darch@neotxt.dk @mckinley@twtxt.net Yes, I just meant to remove the line, when there are no naviation links. But it’s fine. Thank you, darch!

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I noticed some unnecessary horizontal rules being rendered at the bottom of twts in the conversation view lately with yarnd’s new design change. They can be seen at least when not being logged in. Not sure if it is the same experience with an active user session. I reckon there will be fork buttons then, so in that case they would be fine, indeed.

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In fact, these lines are implemented as border-top CSS properties of twt-nav-classed <nav> containers. But the <nav>s are empty, so I would expect them not being there in the first place. Empty navigation doesn’t make much sense to me.

In any case, keep up the good work! :-)

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In-reply-to » @lyse @mckinley @eaplmx the code you requested to follow all the twtxt mentions (https://github.com/tkanos/we-are-twtxt on the folder search)

@tkanos@twtxt.net Cool! I like your disclaimer in the readme. :-D A few things caught my eye while scrolling through the code, the ones I remember:

  1. The protocol switch in lines 141ff could make use of else if.
  2. There’s a superfluous space in the progress bar in line 155.
  3. The User-Agent header contains a { which I reckon is a typo. Also, I reckon the URL and nick should be swapped, in case you wanted to stick to this discoverability format.
  4. The feed discovery regex assumes that filenames always are twtxt.txt which will miss a few feeds, such as @anth@a.9srv.net’s and @hxii@0xff.nu’s. Parsing mentions would be more accurate. And then also parse all mentions from a twt, not just the first one.
  5. If you’re still bored, adding support for archived feeds would be a thing. :-)

Anyways, nice work!

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In-reply-to » Testing something... https://yarn.zn80.net/external?uri=https://example.com/~foo/twtxt.txt&nick=

@mckinley@twtxt.net My client parses the mention and just shows the URL. Since I don’t follow that feed, it is rendered white on red just like any other feed I don’t follow. My markdown support is very limited, inline code is unknown to tt, so the mentions put in code blocks are just treated as regular mentions. And then you can see, that you mentioned me incorrectly. :-P

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Boy, it was fricking cold with the wind today. Can’t believe that just three weeks ago I was sweating like a pig. But the rain clouds were pretty nice. Only my camera struggled very much with these lighing conditions. Basically half of the images totally blurred.

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The common kestrel on the nature reserve sign didn’t see me coming, so I managed to sneak in up to about ten meters before it took off quickly.

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In-reply-to » One of my friends did a very good joke, I was talking with him about privacy on internet, and he replied to me : - What are you talking about, you use firefox on Linux in a village of maximum 1000 people, you don't even need to use cookies.

@tkanos@twtxt.net :-D Sadly, so much truth in that, though.

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In-reply-to » For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least.

@mckinley@twtxt.net Oh, very interesting, thank you! Hahaha, great finding about comments. It never occurred to me either. Same with empty lines I reckon. I reckon a comment extension should be documented next. ;-)

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In-reply-to » Guys, I have a bad news, I went through the twtxt-osphere : - I found 1289 twtxt account - among those 721 are accessible ( 712 http / 9 gemini / 0 gopher) - but only 111 account are still active in 2022 :S (107 http / 4 gemini / 0 gopher).

@tkanos@twtxt.net Thanks for the clarification. Haha, it’s always the same with quickly cobbled together code. ;-)

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In-reply-to » For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least.

@mckinley@twtxt.net I got your point and I’m also under the impression that \t is allowed in the message. Can you elaborate on why you think it is not?

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In-reply-to » For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least.

@darch@neotxt.dk Titles and subjects are two different things in my opinion. A title is a caption, brief summary or some description of a longer content that follows. A subject is a – in this case human readable – reference in a reply to some topic in order to group several twts to a conversation. Forks aside, the first twt starting a discussion typically doesn’t have a subject. But some article would have a title in most cases. You are right in that the subject mechanism could be abused for a crude title implementation. I wouldn’t do it, though.

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In-reply-to » For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least.

@mckinley@twtxt.net Even though I miss a title for general purposes, I’m not sold of cramming it into twtxt. It’s just not made for it. To only announce new articles, that format would work, though. It’s basically what some people already do, except a space rather than a tab is used between the title and link.

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In-reply-to » Related with my current conversation, what do you think of using twtxt.txt as a format for feeds?

Not sure which conversation you mean, @eaplmx@twtxt.net (it’s already quite late here), but here’s my take: I think twtxt it’s not heavy enough. For a real feed format I would like to have a clear separation between titles and content. And more options for the content. Plaintext and HTML at least. Twtxt is plaintext, but lots of folks (me included) actually use markdown in their yarns. However, the actual format being used is not advertised anywhere. To make things worse, I actually prefer reStructuredText over markdown. For podcasts some enclosure-like thing would be nice as well. Twtxt being line based also really limits structuring of longer content by hand. Just can’t produce a nice source file.

On the other hand, RSS and Atom being XML are way too heavy for my taste. And then there’s JSON feed. It’s been a while since I skimmed over it, can’t remember the details, but I wasn’t sold on this one either. I also never encountered any JSON feed in the wild. So I’m still on my quest to find an optimal feed format.

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In-reply-to » Guys, I have a bad news, I went through the twtxt-osphere : - I found 1289 twtxt account - among those 721 are accessible ( 712 http / 9 gemini / 0 gopher) - but only 111 account are still active in 2022 :S (107 http / 4 gemini / 0 gopher).

@tkanos@twtxt.net So basically it counts the mentions? We definitely need some feed normalization database, too many broken mentions out there. :-)

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In-reply-to » Writing and running full e2e integration tests using Go and for Go CLI applications. Lookingo into one of:

@prologic@twtxt.net Whoops, I must have missed the error return value! That sounds good to me. When there are just fatal errors that abort the program execution, a main function returning an error is definitely enough.

Hmm, if you don’t want to report errors to stderr, where do you write them to? Hopefully not stdout. A log file? It obviously depends on the program and such, but generally I do not want to dig up errors from a log file. Usually, I find it much more convenient to see them directly. Properly dealing with stdout and stderr basically provides the capabilities for free to be pipeline-ready. And of course, -q or something along those lines is also a good choice. When talking about more serious programs, that is. Not just some quickly cobbled together helper.

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In-reply-to » 💡 TIL: Today I learned that there is nothing special about pkg/ inside of Go projects. It is just like any other sub-package structure you might otherwise define in your project. It just adds an extra part to your imports. I think it's actually confusing at best and just unnecessary typing and an unnecessary sub-structure. Just keep your packages in the top-level and be done with it 👌

@prologic@twtxt.net I’m bad with terminology, sorry. But I think, we’re basically on the same page. The only thing I wanted to say is, that I fully agree with @brasshopper@twtxt.net’s theory here and tried to elaborate a bit.

Even if you have a very deep knowledge of one language, you typically won’t know about all the styles, patterns, spirits, etc. when starting to pick up a new one. Some ideomatics are just different. So when tackling something, you naturally do it like you’ve been doing it before in other language(s). In the beginning it just doesn’t occur to you, that something might be done (entirely) differently in this new language. It takes time to pick up and sometimes even more to wrap your head around it. Open-mindedness certainly also helps, I found. The more you’ve really worked with different languages, the more your little knowledge base grows. Hence, you know that things can be solved in lots of different ways. And that will basically bring you awareness, that you might want to look out for the specific procedures of doing something in that other language you’re using.

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In-reply-to » Writing and running full e2e integration tests using Go and for Go CLI applications. Lookingo into one of:

@prologic@twtxt.net Logging is different, I meant regular errors messages. E.g. you invoke the program with an invalid argument or something else goes wrong. That should then be reported on stderr and not stdout. When striving for a good coverage rate, error cases should not be forgotten in my opinion. Ideally, error messages are tested, too. I’ve seen a bunch of cases in the past, where something was broken, because there weren’t any tests. But to be fair, I neglect them most of time, too. :-( Just checked, go-cmdtest merges both stdout and -err, that’s a no-go in my books.

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In-reply-to » 💡 TIL: Today I learned that there is nothing special about pkg/ inside of Go projects. It is just like any other sub-package structure you might otherwise define in your project. It just adds an extra part to your imports. I think it's actually confusing at best and just unnecessary typing and an unnecessary sub-structure. Just keep your packages in the top-level and be done with it 👌

@prologic@twtxt.net @brasshopper@twtxt.net @tkanos@twtxt.net Exactly, you just know what you know. You simply can’t follow a pattern which you haven’t heard of, so you just stick to what you’ve been doing in the past. From my own experience and what I’ve seen from others, it’s getting much better with more experience.

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